CVE-2020-24586 (ac_1550_firmware, ac_3165_firmware, ac_3168_firmware, ac_7265_firmware, ac_8260_firmware, ac_8265_firmware, ac_9260_firmware, ac_9461_firmware, ac_9462_firmware, ac_9560_firmware, ax1650_firmware, ax1675_firmware, ax200_firmware, ax201_firmware, ax210_firmware, c-200_firmware, c-230_firmware, c-235_firmware, c-250_firmware, c-260_firmware, debian_linux, ieee_802.11, linux_kernel, mac80211)

CVE-2020-24586 (ac_1550_firmware, ac_3165_firmware, ac_3168_firmware, ac_7265_firmware, ac_8260_firmware, ac_8265_firmware, ac_9260_firmware, ac_9461_firmware, ac_9462_firmware, ac_9560_firmware, ax1650_firmware, ax1675_firmware, ax200_firmware, ax201_firmware, ax210_firmware, c-200_firmware, c-230_firmware, c-235_firmware, c-250_firmware, c-260_firmware, debian_linux, ieee_802.11, linux_kernel, mac80211)

The 802.11 standard that underpins Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA, WPA2, and WPA3) and Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) doesn’t require that received fragments be cleared from memory after (re)connecting to a network. Under the right circumstances, when another device sends fragmented frames encrypted using WEP, CCMP, or GCMP, this can be abused to inject arbitrary network packets and/or exfiltrate user data.Read More